Three Photos

After my parents died, these photos were among the things passed down. They show my father as an infant, his mother’s family, my Winship grandparents, who I knew, and my Slocum great-grandparents, who died before I was born. And my Aunt Mame, who also went by Mazie.

Bucktooth Run WEB

Bucktooth Run CU

Bucktooth Run (circa 1905). L. to r., Hollis Slocum, Abbie Slocum, Charles & Minerva Slocum, Homer Slocum and his sweetheart, Mazie Anderson.

Bess WEB

Bess CU

August 4, 1905. L. to r., Hollis Slocum, Charles Slocum, Abbie Slocum with her arm around an unnamed yearling, Minerva Slocum, Mazie Anderson (with a rifle on her shoulder) and Homer Slocum. (Also, Bess the Horse appears at the left in the larger photo.)

Slocum WEB

Circa 1914. Standing, L. to R., Abbie & Clair Winship; Mazie & Homer Slocum; Edith Slocum standing in front of her father, Lewis Slocum, and Hollis Slocum. Seated, Charles & Minerva Slocum, and in Minerva’s lap their grandson, Keith Winship, son of Clair & Abbie.

These photos were taken near Bucktooth Run, between Little Valley and Salamanca, New York. Charles E. Slocum (1847- 1923) was the son of William G. and Anna E. Slocum. His wife, Minerva (Jones) Slocum (1850-1922), was the daughter of Sylvester Jones (1817-1899) and Belinda Jones (b. 1820). Minerva had two brothers: Charles Jones of Montana, and Noble Jones of Bucktooth Run, and a sister, Estella.

Charles’ and Minerva’s eldest son was Lewis H. Slocum (1875-1953). In 1901, he married Thressa Widrig (1873-1922), daughter of Conrad and Harriet Widrig. The year before the marriage, she had been a servant in the Slocum household. Lewis worked as a farm laborer, and later making veneer. Thressa was alive at the time the 1914 photo was taken; I do not know why she doesn’t appear. Edith May Slocum (1901-1973) was the daughter of Lewis and Thressa; Edith married Harry Luther Hoover in 1920; they had two daughters: Lorraine and Virginia.

The second son, Homer Jones Slocum (1880-1938), moved to Niagara Falls in 1903 and worked for the Niagara Power Company. He married Mary Jane Anderson on June 20, 1906. He died of a heart attack at work on August 6, 1938. Mary Jane Anderson was born in Beamsville, Ontario, October 26, 1877; she was the daughter of John Anderson and Jane Ballantine Anderson who were born in Scotland and emigrated to Canada.

To her contemporaries, Mary Jane was known as Mazie or Mame. After Homer’s death, she lived in Niagara Falls with her niece, Mary Lou (a.k.a. Mrs. Hardell Shipp; Mrs. Wilson Aaron; Mrs. Edwin Trask) (1921-1981), daughter of Frederick Young and Dorothy Ann (Anderson) Young (d. 1957), and Mary Lou’s children, Glenda Aaron and Frederick Homer Shipp a.k.a. Frederick Trask (1948-1995). Mame Slocum died in 1981.

The third son, Hollis William Slocum (1885-1927). In 1920, he was working in a furniture factory, but by 1923 he had moved to Campbell, N.Y., where he worked as a cheese maker. On February 23, 1923, he married Ethel Mary Crance, a divorcee from Corning, N.Y., in Salamanca, in the parsonage of the local church, probably because this was a second marriage for the bride. The Campbell newspaper reported, “The marriage of this popular young couple came as a great surprise to their friends here.” In 1927, Hollis died at the hospital in Bath, N.Y., after “an illness of several weeks.”

Charles’ and Minerva’s daughter, Abbie Belinda Slocum (1891-1980), married Clair C. Winship (1889-1975) on December 30, 1912. Keith Winship (1913-1998) was their firstborn son, and my father. His siblings, Elliott, Eva and Lee, provided me with wonderful aunts, uncles and cousins.

 

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2 comments

  1. Hi Kihm – I’m Taylor, archivist for the Firesign Theatre. By any chance did you keep a physical copy of your 10/27/1974 article on Firesign Theatre / Proctor & Bergman? I’d love to have a scan for the archive. I’m digitizing old open reels at the moment, and I’ve definitely got some WOUR tapes in here – I’ll see if they kept copies of some of the other radio interviews you mention.

    1. Taylor, Yes, I have a copy of the original piece, and yes, I’d be happy to scan it for you. That was one of the most wonderful days of my life, and I’d be happy to archive it for you! Kihm

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